The job board database was illegally accessed and large amounts of user data were stolen.


As is the case with many companies that maintain large databases of information, Monster is the target of illegal attempts to access and extract information from its database. We recently learned our database was illegally accessed and certain contact and account data were taken, including Monster user IDs and passwords, email addresses, names, phone numbers, and some basic demographic data. The information accessed does not include resumes. Monster does not generally collect – and the accessed information does not include – sensitive data such as social security numbers or personal financial data.

The fact that the database was accessed illegally (no word on if it was an internal or external access) is a huge deal. However the fact that they stored passwords in either plaintext, or in a weak enough hash that they feel all the user passwords are compromised, is the most disturbing part of this news in my opinion.

Photo by Dave

There is no excuse for either of those security failures. Especially after the highly public loss of 1.3 million users’ data in 2007.

Assume that your database will be accessed at some point by someone with nefarious intent. If it can happen to it can happen to you. Therefore you should not store passwords in plaintext or weakly hashed.

Use a salted SHA-256 or bcrypt hashing algorithm to protect your users’ accounts.

If you use ATG please check out the open source SecurePassword ATG module. It replaces the default insecure password hashing algorithm with a salted SHA-256 hashing mechanism. (as a side note I will develop a bcrypt version shortly, but SSHA-256 is very secure).